Acquiring volatile memory from Android based devices with LiME Forensics, Part I

Android Memory AcquisitionMy first guest post on the Open Security Research Blog was published yesterday. In this post I walk through the steps required to install and compile LiME Forensics, a Loadable Kernel Module that allows you to dump the full contents of memory of an Android based device. The instructions have been tested successfully on Ubuntu 11.10, with Java SE Development Kit 6 Update 31, the Android SDK r18, NDK r7c and with the emulator running an Android Viritual Device (avd) based on Android 4.0.3 (API 15).

If you spot any errors, typos or mistakes please let me know, as I spent endless hours dealing with “cross-compiling kernel modules for Android” headaches. Actually the aim of this post is to save you from “some” of that pain when compiling LiME.

Enjoy and stay tuned for Part II!

Slides from my Android Forensics talk at the Symposium for Android Security in Malaga

I have just uploaded to the Papers & Presentations section the slides for my talk on “Latest Advances in Android Forensics” (in Spanish) at the 1st International Symposium for Android Security held in Malaga last week:

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When Prevention Fails: Extending IR and Digital Forensics to the Corporate Network (slides from SANS Boston 2011)

The slides from my @night talk at SANS Boston 2011 are available for download now:

When Prevention Fails, Extending IR and Digital Forensics Capabilities to the Corporate Network (PDF – 6,2 MB)

Speaking at SANS Boston

Thanks to Barbara Basalguete, Stephen Northcutt and the rest of the SANS crew for the opportunity to participate in such a great event, as well as to all the attendees that preferred to stay around after a long training day instead of heading off to Harvard Square for Friday party!

When Prevention Fails: Extending IR and Digital Forensics capabilities to the corporate network

2011 is being a big year for cybersecurity incidents with high profile attacks reported against large organizations including HBGary Federal, RSA, Lockheed Martin and several Sony companies among others. With smarter intruders that can make use of both very sophisticated attacks and simple, yet effective, phishing attacks against our users, everyone should assume that at some point their preventive measures will fail, and that sooner or later you will have to recover from a future intrusion. Based on this assumption several questions arise: When prevention fails, what is left? Am I ready to detect, react and recover from an intrusion? What can Network Security Monitoring and Digital Forensics do for me?

Ismael’s talk will address these questions, describing the latest trends in computer attacks and intrusions, including the use of Botnets and what has been called the Advanced Persistent Threats (APT). Lastly, Ismael will show how Network Security Monitoring (NSM) and Digital Forensics methods and tools can be extended to the corporate network to assist in the early detection and investigation of these threats. Best practices and techniques on how to do NSM, full packet capture, network forensic analysis and data carving will be discussed, along with some live demos using tools that are available to any security practitioner.